Window Technology

If you want to know what the latest and greatest is in window technology from around the world, check out this innovative high-end product from Europe.

What does a product like this sourced in Switzerland have to do with us here on the left coast of Canada? The answer is that this product will soon be installed in a project right here in our very own Whistler.

This is indicative of two undeniable trends. 

First of all, a wave of creative energy is coursing through the world of construction as designers, engineers, building code officials, and builders grapple with the need to reduce the energy requirements of our homes and work spaces.  The energy consumption of our buildings represents a significant portion of overall energy demands; reducing these where possible only makes sense.  With more of the cars we will drive in the future relying on charging stations in our homes and along our highways, the reductions in automotive-consumed fossil fuels will translate into an even greater requirement for electrical energy in our province.

While among us we British Columbians may hold a broad range of opinions about climate change, Greta Thunberg’s role in the discussion, and the various timelines shouted at us from all angles for the “point of no return”, I think we can all agree that we do not wish to see any additional future hydro-electric projects damming up our province, or continued reliance on coal-fired electricity that we now purchase steadily from Alberta.

Secondly, globalization is not new to any of us, and it means traditional borders are becoming ever more porous when it comes to introducing new products from around the world.  So we will continue to see more and more internationally sourced innovations right here in our own British Columbia construction projects.  Hopefully too, Canadian ingenuity will persist and we will continue to dazzle the world with our own share of made-in-Canada break-through products.

So innovation in the building industry can and must continue. As improved building products and methods become more available, they will become  more economical to employ in every day building projects.  Change is uncomfortable in some respects, but the absence of brick-sized cell phones and V-8 powered family sedans in use today suggests that the “change train” aint stoppin’ any time soon.  I think it will be quite some time before many of us see air tight Swiss windows in our homes, but it is fun to see what’s coming down the pipe.

-Ken Connolly